ADURO NEWS

 

24.02.2015 | ADURO BIOPOLYMERS AND EASTERN BIOPLASTICS ANNOUNCE TECHNOLOGY LICENSING AND COMMERCIALIZATION PARTNERSHIP

HAMILTON, New Zealand – February 24, 2015– Aduro Biopolymers LP and Wallace Corporation today announced they have signed an exclusive regional agreement with US-based Eastern BioPlastics, LLC (EBP) for the commercialization of EBP’s Feather Intermediate and Feathersorb™.

FeatherSorb™ is an environmentally-friendly cost-effective industrial absorbent product range engineered to provide better absorbency and cost performance for fuel, oil, paint and chemical solvent spills and clean up applications. FeatherSorb™ is made from poultry feathers which are processed into a Feather Intermediate (“FI”) with extraordinary properties and characteristics including absorbency, buoyancy, insulation against heat and cold, flame resistance, and filtration. The proprietary and scalable manufacturing process for FI and FeatherSorb™ was developed and perfected by EBP, which is based in Mount Crawford, VA.

The agreement paves the way for Aduro to become the exclusive manufacturer and distributor for Feather Intermediate and FeatherSorb in Australia, New Zealand, and the other members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Aduro Biopolymers is a research, development and manufacturing company located in Hamilton, New Zealand and entered into the agreement with Wallace Corporation, New Zealand’s leading co-product partner to the food processing industry and an Aduro shareholder. Aduro Biopolymers was formed from a partnership between Wallace Corporation and WaikatoLink Limited, the technology transfer company of the University of Waikato.

“Aduro Biopolymers and Wallace Corporation are perfect partners for EBP at this stage in our growth,” said Sonny Meyerhoeffer, EBP Founder and CEO. “Wallace Corporation is proactively looking for opportunities to increase the economic returns it makes from the processing of primary sector raw materials and Aduro’s mission is to develop and manufacture a range of products and materials from bio-derived sources including polymers and materials that offer a cost effective solution for use in plastics, composites, agriculture and horticulture, manufacturing, construction and other sectors.”

“We are excited at the opportunity to collaborate with EBP,” said Darren Harpur, CEO of Aduro Biopolymers. “We believe EBP’s proprietary processes for producing FI from poultry feathers has tremendous potential in consumer, industrial, emergency response and disaster areas of the absorbents market, which will be our initial focus. We’re also interested in exploring other markets for FI including insulation and filtration applications and as a material blended with plastics to make composites. We are looking forward to a long and mutually rewarding partnership.”

CEO of Wallace Corporation Graham Shortland says in the global poultry industry feathers are currently almost exclusively used to produce feather meal, which is a high protein ingredient for certain animal feeds, and that this agreement created the potential to deliver higher returns from processed feathers. “We are always looking for innovations that will help us sustainably deliver greater value from raw materials so this is a great opportunity for both companies.”

In addition to this initiative with EBP, Aduro is in the final stages of a product development program using its proprietary bioplastic Novatein® for products used within the red meat industry.

EBP’s agreement with Aduro and Wallace follows a recently signed European distribution agreement. The FeatherSorb™ product range is currently being used in a wide range of settings in the US from airports and ports, to breweries and auto parts makers. Meyerhoeffer says, “The feedback has been very encouraging. A great example is Dynamic Aviation based near us in Virginia which has told us it’s a better alternative to the leading competitors, it’s cheaper, and it’s bio-degradable. Their mechanics like it because the FeatherSorb holds and retains the oil without any leaching and is much better than our competitors.”

According to Mr. Meyerhoeffer, the rapidly growing global industrial absorbents industry, which the FeatherSorbTM products target, is a $2.5 billion market. EBP has also launched two FI-based bioplastic resins, MegaPelletTM and Emerald ResinTM, for resin producers and compounders.


 

04.02.2015 | R & D MANAGER JOHAN VERBEEK APPEARS IN THE CHEMICAL ENGINEER

Aduro Biopolymers R & D Manager Dr Johan Verbeek has published an article in The Chemical Engineer Today describing an innovation which uses waste blood from meat processing to create a valuable bio-based plastic.

The article can be read here.


Aduro Materials
Darren Harpur | CEO at Aduro Biopolymers LP

26.03.2014 | ADURO BIOPOLYMERS APPOINTS CEO FOLLOWING STRONG GROWTH

Aduro Biopolymers, a Hamilton-based research, development and manufacturing company, today announced the appointment of Darren Harpur as Chief Executive. The appointment follows investment from Wallace Corporation Limited alongside founding shareholder WaikatoLink.

Aduro Biopolymers was founded in 2013 with a mission to be a key part of a greener solution being sought by companies around the world. Manufacturers and consumers alike are interested in reducing the impact of plastics in the environment, and of industrial processes in their local communities. The enterprise is a spin-out of WaikatoLink Limited, the commercialisation and technology transfer company of the University of Waikato.

Aduro Biopolymers Chairman Graham Shortland says, “Darren has led the company through some very significant milestones as Acting Chief Executive. We’re very pleased to appoint him to the role full time.”

Harpur, formerly a Commercial Manager at WaikatoLink says, “2013 was a pivotal year for the company. I’m very pleased to take up the role of Aduro Biopolymers’ first Chief Executive as we work to commercialise our first products for the market.”

“The company is now in a unique position to capitalise on recent research in the field of bioplastics as well as developments in the use of imprinted polymers for industrial waste remediation, and the targeted filtration and recovery of chemicals, metals and other substances. We’re working on a number of exciting opportunities.”

Aduro Biopolymers is investigating the feasibility of establishing a New Zealand plant to process poultry feathers into a range of products, including polypropylene and polyethylene filled resins with an international company. The company is also in the final stages of a product development program using its proprietary Novatein® bioplastic resin, for applications within the red meat industry.

Aduro Biopolymers has also recently signed agreements with Scion for the commercialisation of bioplastic resins using fruit residues, and with Hamilton based company Ligar Polymers to manufacture imprinted polymers.

Aduro’s proprietary bioplastic resin Novatein® was developed at the University of Waikato’s School of Engineering by Chemical Engineer Dr Johan Verbeek and his team. Verbeek was recently named as the winner of the University’s inaugural Commercial Research Excellence Award, and is Aduro Biopolymers’ R & D Manager.

Duncan Mackintosh, Chief Executive of WaikatoLink says, “It’s really satisfying to play a role in transferring highly innovative science from the University to the marketplace. Aduro Biopolymers has created a compelling proposition for potential partners and customers and attracted strong commercial interest. This appointment represents the next growth phase for the company.”

According to Harpur the potential of the company is significant. “The global plastics market alone is worth over a trillion dollars and currently bioplastics represent 5-10% of that market and is growing quickly.”


 

08.10.2013 | R & D MANAGER WINS SCIENCE ENTREPRENEUR AWARD

Aduro Biopolymers R & D Manager Dr Johan Verbeek was awarded Science Entrepreneur of the Year in the 2013 Kudos Awards held on the 26th September.

The Kudos Awards were launched in June 2007 and are now an annual celebration of local scientific innovations impacting the Waikato region, New Zealand and the world.

The Science Entrepreneur of the Year Awards recognises a major, recent achievement in commercialising a scientific achievement from the Waikato region that has the potential to add value to New Zealand, and was awarded for Dr Verbeek’s work on Novatein™.

The Kudos Award comes on top of the Research Excellence Award made by the University of Waikato this year, and follows becoming a Kudos finalist in 2011 and receiving the Bayer Innovators Award in 2009.

Dr Verbeek says “I have enjoyed working on the project to date and I am looking forward to the new exciting prospects over the next few years. Making this a success was a team effort and it is gratifying to see how the team is growing.”

Aduro Biopolymers Chairman Graham Shortland says “The Board congratulates Johan on his achievement, which is yet another recognition of Johan’s work and dedication to the ongoing development of Novatein™. We are pleased to have Johan as part of Aduro Biopolymers research team and we certainly concur with the Kudos judges on the exemplary work and achievement of Johan in winning this award.”

Aduro Biopolymers CEO Darren Harpur says “Johan continues to receive richly deserved recognition for his work on Novatein™. Johan has dedicated many long hours to this project and it is pleasing to see his work being publically recognised.”


 

19.08.2013 | ADURO R & D MANAGER WINS RESEARCH EXCELLENCE AWARD

Dr Johan Verbeek, Aduro Biopolymers R & D Manager was recently awarded the University of Waikato’s Commercial Research Award in the Universities inaugural Research Excellence Awards held recently.

The awards acknowledge the University’s top performing researchers undertaking high quality diverse and relevant research, and was awarded specifically for Dr Verbeek’s research into Novatein™.

Dr Verbeek says “it is very rewarding to know that the university is recognising commercial work and values the contribution I have made to business community”.

Aduro Biopolymers CEO Darren Harpur say’s “Johan’s success in these awards is well deserved. From a very early stage Johan recognised the commercial impact his research on Novatein™ could have. Over the last 5 years he has supervised 23 or more students who have completed research on Novatein™, which is a testament to his enthusiasm for the subject, and his willingness to see it successful”.

Aduro Biopolymers Chairman Graham Shortland says “The Board of Aduro Biopolymers congratulates Johan on his success after many years of hard work and commitment. It is pleasing to see that Johan’s peers have recognised the contribution Johan’s research has made to the foundation of Aduro Biopolymers and we hope for Johan’s continued contribution to the success of the company.”


Aduro Materials
Darren Harpur | CEO at Aduro Biopolymers LP
 

27.05.2013 | BLOOD-BASED PLASTIC A GREEN BONUS

Aduro Bioploymers was today featured in an article in on New Zealand Herald website.


Aduro Biopolymers Team
Sir William Gallagher (Director, WaikatoLink), Sir James Wallace (Chairman, Wallace Corporation), Duncan Mackintosh (CEO, WaikatoLink), Dr Johan Verbeek (University of Waikato researcher) and Professor Roy Crawford (Vice-Chancellor, University of Waikato) with Novatein bioplastic from Aduro Biopolymers.

23.05.2013 | ADURO BIOPOLYMERS DEAL RECOGNISED IN KIWINET INNOVATION AWARDS

Hamilton, New Zealand, 23 May 2013 – The formation of spin-out company Aduro Biopolymers by WaikatoLink Limited, the technology transfer organisation of the University of Waikato, has resulted in a finals place in the Commercial Deal Award in the KiwiNet Research Commercialisation Awards. Winners will be announced at an awards function on 19th June in Auckland.

Aduro Biopolymers was set up to commercialise a diverse range of materials and polymers from industry co-products and low value waste streams for use in plastics, composites, manufacturing, agriculture, and the building and construction sectors. The company’s lead product, a bioplastic called Novatein™, is made from naturally occurring materials that on their own quickly degrade in the environment.

In February the company received investment from Wallace Corporation Limited, by volume New Zealand’s largest service rendering business.

Darren Harpur, Acting CEO of Aduro Biopolymers says, “It’s really pleasing to be recognised for the hard work done over 5 or 6 years which has culminated in a complex investment and investment structure which intends to build a company of some scale.

“The deal will fully fund all the operations including an Australian product development programme for Novatein™. It also aligns with the interests of Wallace Corporation as we provide a way to take innovative technology to market building on Wallace Corporation’s strategy of adding further value to exsiting commodity products they produce. In this case, blood meal. This builds on the strategic partnership Wallace Corporation has with the University as a way to continually source innovation.”

Harpur says the goal is to have price competitive sustainable product in the market in 2016 or 2017.

Duncan Mackintosh, Chief Executive of WaikatoLink says, “Aduro Biopolymers is attracting commercial interest as they’re solving problems and providing real alternatives with their novel and high quality natural materials for industry. It’s really satisfying to play a role in transferring highly innovative science from the University to the marketplace.”

Harpur adds “The potential of the company is significant. The global plastics market is worth over a trillion dollars and currently bioplastics represent 5-10% of that market and is growing quickly. Novatein creates a compelling proposition for potential partners and customers due to its simple cost effective manufacturing processes and its environmental benefits.”

The science behind Novatein originated and continues to be developed by the School of engineering out of the University of Waikato by Chemical Engineer Dr Johan Verbeek and his team. Novatein has been in development since 2007 and has received investment support from KiwiNet’s PreSeed Accelerator Fund from the Ministry of Science and Innovation.

Twelve finalists have been selected for the inaugural KiwiNet Research Commercialisation Awards designed to celebrate success within New Zealand’s research organisations. Four category winners and a people’s choice award will be announced at an awards function on 19th June.


Aduro Materials
Darren Harpur | CEO at Aduro Biopolymers LP

19.03.2013 | DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTICS FROM BIOMATERIALS: AN INTERVIEW WITH DARREN HARPUR

Darren Harpur, Acting CEO at Aduro Biopolymers, talks to AZoM about the Development of Plastics from Biomaterials.

KK - Please can you summarise the main products and services by Aduro Biopolymers?

DH - Aduro Biopolymers (Aduro) is a Limited Partnership formed to develop and commercialise a diverse range of biopolymer materials derived from natural resources for use in plastics, composites, manufacturing, agriculture, and the building and construction sectors.

The company’s focus is the development and delivery of high quality novel and natural materials for use in these sectors by accessing the very best science in New Zealand, and from around the world.

The full interview can be found here.


James Wallace, chairman of Wallace Corp., left, and professor Roy Crawford, vice-chancellor of the University of Waikato in New Zealand, hold various bioplastic products.

22.02.2013 | PARTNERS SOUGHT FOR MEAT-BASED BIOPLASTIC

HAMILTON, NEW ZEALAND A New Zealand biopolymer company that is turning meat byproducts into bioplastic, is in discussions with commercial partners in Australia and New Zealand.

Aduro Biopolymers LP, based in Hamilton, hopes to see its meat-based bioplastic, called Novatein, in commercial use by 2016 or 2017...

WaikatoLink Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of New Zealand's University of Waikato, established Aduro Biopolymers. WaikatoLink develops environmentally conscious materials for manufacturing and construction sectors. It commercializes technologies developed by the university.

Blood meal, which is produced by steam drying animal blood collected from abattoirs, is used to create the renewable thermoplastic. Blood meal is processed into granules, which are then converted into injection molded or extruded products. The granules are customized and formulated to suit the different properties of specific polymer products ...

View the full interview here: http://www.plasticsnews.com


Sir William Gallagher (Director, WaikatoLink), Sir James Wallace (Chairman, Wallace Corporation), Duncan Mackintosh (CEO, WaikatoLink), Dr Johan Verbeek (University of Waikato researcher) and Professor Roy Crawford (Vice-Chancellor, University of Waikato) with Novatein bioplastic from Aduro Biopolymers.

21.02.2013 | ADURO BIOPOLYMERS SECURES INVESTMENT FROM WALLACE CORPORATION

"Aduro Biopolymers has developed an innovative method for the production of bioplastics made from by-products of the red meat and poultry industries," says Graham Shortland, CEO of Wallace Corporation. "We’re always looking for innovative ways to turn new and existing raw materials into higher value products in order to sustainably deliver superior returns to our meat processing partners.”

“We’ve been very impressed by the team at WaikatoLink and their track record in commercialisation as well as the quality of research from the University of Waikato. This investment is part of a broader strategy and the start of a partnership that will allow us to bring new research from the University into our business."

Duncan Mackintosh, the Chief Executive of WaikatoLink says, "It’s fantastic to secure investment at such a key point in the company’s development. We’re also delighted to have Sir James Wallace join the Aduro board. Aduro Biopolymers is a great example of an early stage innovative company based on publically funded research. It’s encouraging to see a successful established company like Wallace Corporation value this innovation and its commercial promise as part of its strategy. This partnership will help the success of Aduro and open up new opportunities too.”

Aduro Polymers aim is to develop environmentally conscious materials for the manufacturing and construction sectors. The company’s first product is Novatein, a bioplastic that will be price competitive with petrochemical plastics. The global plastics market is worth over a trillion dollars and currently bioplastics represent 5-10% of that market, with a compounded annual growth rate of almost 20%.

Darren Harpur, Acting CEO of Aduro Biopolymers says, “The manufacturing process for Novatein is quite simple. This means the capital costs required to commence manufacture will be relatively low and should enable the cost effective production of Novatein. There is a growing demand for environmentally friendly plastics but they need to be at the right price point for consumers. We are confident we can achieve this price point with Novatein.”

The science behind Novatein originated and continues to be developed by the University of Waikato’s Dr Johan Verbeek and his team, where bloodmeal produced by the red meat industry is processed into granules which have been modified and optimised to suit a chosen product’s attributes. The granules can then be manufactured into injection moulded or extruded products using industry standard equipment. Novatein has been in development since 2007 and has received investment support from KiwiNet’s PreSeed Accelerator Fund from the Ministry of Science and Innovation.

Harpur says, “As consumers, we’re all aware of the effects of plastics on the environment. Novatein will help solve some of those problems by introducing a bioplastic made from naturally occurring materials that on their own quickly degrade in the environment. We think that this aspect combined with a simple manufacturing process will enable our technology to be adopted quite rapidly.”

University of Waikato Vice-Chancellor Professor Roy Crawford says the work done by Dr Verbeek and his team has garnered much interest as it has developed and it is pleasing to see the investment by Wallace Corporation. “At the University of Waikato we promote the delivery of world-changing and relevant research. In this case we have research that takes low value co-product of the red meat industry and creates a biodegradable plastic. I consider that highly relevant to our world and is an excellent example of research that is making a difference.”

Aduro Biopolymers is working with commercial partners in New Zealand and Australia to develop Novatein for a range of product lines. The company is also looking to work with New Zealand research organisations to develop new and novel materials from other natural resource polymers.


Aduro Materials
Sir James Wallace, chairman of Wallace Corp., left, and Professor Roy Crawford, vice-chancellor of the University of Waikato in New Zealand, hold various bioplastic products.

20.02.2013 | Waikato Uni company turns blood into plastic

A Waikato University research company has pioneered what it believes is a world first. It's found a way to turn dried blood and animal waste into products like plant pots, seedling trays and even pegs.

“Dry blood it sounds icky, I know, and it is something that's certainly a bit odd, but it's a protein and protein is a plastic,” says researcher Johan Verbeek.

Plastic pollutes waterways and threatens marine life, and the average New Zealander throws away 45kg of it each year.

“There are plenty of problems out there with plastics and the environment, and everyone knows the impact on the environment with plastics. We have a potential solution here,” says Aduro Biopolymers acting chief executive Darren Harpur.

That solution is a biodegradable plastic. The blood meal is first put in a blender with water and urea, before being fed through an extruder, where the material is heated until it's molten ...

Read the full interview and view the video here


 

06.09.2011 | WAIKATO SCIENTIST NAMED KUDOS FINALIST

Science and Engineering’s Dr Johan Verbeek has been nominated as a finalist in the 2011 Kudos awards for his work turning low-value animal protein into high-value biodegradable plastics.

Developed at Waikato University, the new process creates biodegradable and compostable plastics from what is effectively a waste product of meat processing, bloodmeal.

The Kudos awards are a Waikato initiative held once a year to celebrate science achievement in the region.

“Protein is a plastic, in the simplest form,” says Dr Verbeek who is nominated in the emerging scientist category.

“Proteins are polymers, and plastics are also polymers. Bloodmeal is a protein rich co-product of the meat industry, but is nearly impossible to convert into a plastic product – that was the challenge.”

The discovery is being commercialised by Novatein Ltd through work with WaikatoLink - the commercial arm of the University of Waikato. Novatein Ltd is in the process of registering world-wide patents and also working to license the technology for manufacture in New Zealand.

So far the bioplastic has been earmarked for use in planter cups, seedling trays and pegs for their biodegradable and compostable properties, making them ideal for plant nurseries and other horticultural applications where a temporary support is needed.

“One of the challenges we face is getting a useful life out of the plastics. We’re still working on it every day, but at the moment the bioplastic will last about 12 weeks.

“Our research focus is on waste – taking things that are waste or rubbish and making something useful out of it.”

The University of Waikato has two other finalists in the Kudos awards – Dr Anne Hume and Dr Charles Lee. The winners of the awards will be announced at a dinner on Thursday October 13.


 

08.08.2009 | NOVATEIN SCIENTIST WINS INNOVATORS AWARD FOR BIOPLASTICS RESEARCH

Dr Johan Verbeek has won a Bayer Innovators Award for his research on turning sustainable or waste products into new materials – with a reduced impact on the environment.

Dr Verbeek, a senior lecturer at the University of Waikato's School of Science and Engineering, and the lead scientist for Novatein, was the winner of the Agriculture and Environment category. The awards acknowledge New Zealand’s leading innovators – those who use their knowledge and commitment to improve the lives of New Zealanders and the wider world. The judges were impressed that Dr Verbeek’s research on turning low value or waste animal protein into biologically-derived plastics or bioplastics and biocomposites is being commercialised. The judges said,

“New Zealand produces a large amount raw animal blood and turning it into goods made from plastic polymers is the basis of a viable industry.”
A new company, Novatein Limited, has been established by WaikatoLink, the commercial arm of the University of Waikato, to patent and commercialise Dr Verbeek’s innovative process. The company is expected to have the new biodegradable product on the market within five years. WaikatoLink CEO Mark Stuart said

"Novatein has the kind of high-growth global market potential that we look for in new technologies. The key to commercialisation is to attract investors for ideas that have just come out of the lab."

Novatein is one of seven investments Endeavour Capital has made in WaikatoLink companies. It's testament to the good relationship we've built with them. They know that we have a good, robust process for screening research ideas for commercial potential." Novatein’s technologies are patent protected and offer compelling competitive advantages compared to traditional processes using traditional petrochemical-derived feedstock’s or diverted primary production, such as corn.

Around 1.5kg of bioplastic can be produced from 1kg of blood meal, a waste product from the meat industry. The end products range from packaging through to consumer products. There is a growing global demand for sustainable, biodegradable and recyclable plastic products due to an increased environmental awareness.

Dr David Saul the principal scientist at ZyGEM, another WaikatoLink spinoff company, was a finalist in the Research and Development category of the awards. The six category award winners in the Bayer Innovators Awards are:

  • Agriculture and environment: Johan Verbeek, University of Waikato
  • Science and Health: Olaf Diegel, AUT University
  • Design and Engineering: Chris Mardon and Tom Mackenzie, Energy Mad
  • Information Technology and Communications: Mike Carden and Mark Hellier, Sonar
  • Manufacturing: David Percy, Pertronic
  • Research and Development: Ray Avery, Medicine Mondiale

 

08.08.2009 | Environmentally sensitive bioplastics research recognised

Dr Johan Verbeek has been recognized for his research on turning sustainable or waste products into new materials – with a reduced impact on the environment

Dr Verbeek, a senior lecturer at the University of Waikato’s School of Science and Engineering, has been named as a finalist in the Agriculture and Environment category of the Bayer Innovators Awards.

His leading research focuses on developing technology that can turn low value or waste animal protein into biologically-derived plastics or bioplastics and biocomposites. Around 1.5kg of bioplastic can be produced from 1kg of blood meal, a waste product from the meat industry. The end products range from packaging through to consumer products.

The research is being commercialised by Novatein, a company set up by WaikatoLink, the commercial arm of the University of Waikato. The company, which has venture funding from Endeavour Capital, is continuing to refine and develop its processes under the guidance of Dr Verbeek.

There is a growing global demand for sustainable, biodegradable and recyclable plastic products due to an increased environmental awareness.

Novatein’s technologies are patent protected and offer compelling competitive advantages compared to traditional processes using traditional petrochemical-derived feedstock’s or diverted primary production, such as corn.

The Bayer Innovators Awards acknowledge New Zealand’s leading innovators – those who use their knowledge and commitment to improve the lives of New Zealanders and the wider world.

The six categories in the Bayer Innovators Awards are: Science and Health, Design and Engineering, Agriculture and Environment, Information Technology and Communications, Manufacturing, and Research and Development.

The overall winners from each category will be announced on August 5th at a special cocktail awards evening in Auckland.